Alcohol and blood sugar

Maintaining adequate blood sugar levels is one of the key functions of your metabolism, but when you drink alcohol, maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is one of the first elements of metabolism to be shoved aside in your body’s rush to excrete the toxins as efficiently as possible. Alcohol inhibits your body’s ability to make glucose and to maintain healthy levels of glucose ( or blood sugar ) in the blood.

Over time,  heavy drinkers develop glucose intolerance and can even become diabetic. Even occasional alcohol can cause dangerous drops in blood sugar levels, especially when consumed on an empty stomach. That’s why drinking alcohol can be very dangerous for diabetics and hypoglycemics.

Source; Fitday.com

 

 

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Alcohol can cause weight gain

Because your body can’t store alcohol and must metabolize it straight away, other metabolic processes suffer. Your body won’t metabolize sugars and fats as efficiently during the metabolism of alcohol, and drinking heavily can cause your metabolism to slow.  This can contribute to weight gain, as can the empty calories found in alcohol.

Alcohol also causes weight loss

Alcohol can also cause weight loss in those who drink heavily long-term. Alcohol continues to slow the metabolism of long term drinkers, but it also causes inflammation of the organs of the digestive tract. If you drink heavily in the long-term , alcohol can impair your body’s ability to absorb nutrients. If you become chronically malnourished due to alcohol consumption, you’ll lose weight in spite of your lower metabolism

Source; Fitday.com

Alcohol and nutrition

Alcohol contains only empty calories and has no nutritional value. it can often contribute to malnutrition because high levels of calories in most alcoholic drinks can account for a large percentage of your daily energy requirements. Even one alcoholic drink a day can contribute to malnutrition.

Your body can’t store alcohol, so it must metabolize it straight away. When you drink alcohol, your body makes metabolizing it a priority over all other metabolic processes. Your body sends alcohol to the liver, which produces the enzymes necessary for the oxidation and metabolism of alcohol.

Not only does alcohol not contain any nutrients of its own, but it can impair your body’s natural ability to store nutrients and vitamins from the food you eat.

Source; Fitday.com

Alcohol can cause much more than a tummy upset

Alcohol irritates the digestive system – makes the stomach produce more acid which can lead to gastritis, tummy pain, vomiting, diarrhoea, and in heavy drinkers, sometimes bleeding.

In the longer term there is increased risk of cancer, ulcer, acid reflux

The liver is our largest organ and it has 500 different roles. One of the livers most important functions is to break down food and convert it into energy when you need it. Your liver helps the body get rid of waste products and plays a vital role in fighting infections, particularly in the bowel. And yet when your liver is damaged, you generally won’t know about it – until things get serious!

Source; Drinkaware.co.uk

Alcohol is a terrible messer when it comes to food

Alcohol is notorious for leading people to overeat because of its physiological effect on appetite and because it is generally consumed in a social setting where food is plentiful.

There’s no place to store alcohol in our bodies the way we do food; therefore the body must use incoming alcohol preferentially as its energy source  in order to keep it from reaching toxic levels. This gives alcohol its natural ability to stimulate appetite by depleting the glycogen (carbohydrate) stores in order to metabolize it, causing you to crave carbohydrates.

Alcohol also acts as a diuretic, increasing urination thus decreasing electrolytes like sodium. Again we now begin to crave the things we are losing – hence our desire for salty carbohydrate – like foods ( e.g. chips, crisps, dips, crackers , etc.,).

When you combine alcohol’s natural effects on appetite with its well-known un-inhibiting effects at a destination full of palatable foods, you  have hungry people who often end up with no cares about what and how much food they consume.

 

Source; Neal Spruce, Sharecare.com

The sun shines

Good weather makes a big difference. Warm and dry, long bright days

The horses are full of exuberance, bucking and leaping when they’re turned out

They’re without heavy winter rugs and can smell the growing grass

They have to be kept apart from the new-born lambs, might hurt them accidentally

Birds are shouting at each other, robins have to make way for those returning from their winter retreats

Competition for food intensifies, stuff is growing but it’s still early days

Meanwhile the supermarkets take advantage of the ritual Easter feasting

By selling the “Perfect match” for roast lamb, or the “Perfect partner” for turkey

We’re talking bottles of wine, Easter is a big time for wine

But remember wine is usually around 12 – 14% pure alcohol. And  can be very damaging to your health

Especially if you drink too much. So…

A glass of wine is good, the whole bottle very bad

Have a good Easter. Paste ferecit as they say in Romania

The Cobblestone

Dublin, Smithfield,
Dublin, Smithfield,

The Tumbleweed Love Sessions, a great gig last night

First up the awesome Mongoose, brilliant harmonies and lyrics from a dramatic quartet

Then Hidden Highways lush sound fuses Americana’s country and folk like mist off a swamp

Finally The Prairie Dawgs, the big band sound of Louisiana bluegrass blasts the cobwebs off the Cobblestone

Great music.  Tumbleweed Love Sessions are not to be missed!

Alexander the Great

Alexander inherited the whole of Greece from his father King Philip, who was assassinated when he was barely twenty years old. Alexander was a brave and ambitious warrior, exceptionally handsome with long curly hair. Alexander knew just about everything there was to know at the time – his tutor was Aristotle.

Alexander loved sport and riding more than anything. No one rode better than he. His father once bought a beautiful stallion that no one could tame.  His name was Bucephalus. Whenever anyone tried to ride him they were thrown off. But Alexander worked out why he did it: the horse was afraid of his own shadow. So Alexander turned the horse’s head towards the sun so he couldn’t see his shadow on the ground. Stroking him gently, he swung himself on to his back  and rode him around to widespread applause. From then on Bucephalus was his favorite horse.

Alexander set off on a campaign of conquest and soon he was king of Persia, Greece, Egypt, Phoenicia, Palestine, Babylonia, Assyria and Asia Minor.

This would probably be enough for most people but not Alexander.  In 327 bc he led his army on the most perilous adventures over unknown and unexplored mountain passes and down along the valley of the Indus into India. He was met with fierce opposition and his defeat of King Porus was one of his greatest feats. Instead of taking India he gave it back to the king. They then set off back home only by a different route. He died when he was 32 years old, an age when most people’s lives had only just begun.  He left behind libraries, Alexandria for one held around seven hundred thousand scrolls. Those seven hundred thousand scrolls were the Greek soldiers who set off to conquer the world. And that empire is still standing today. Alexander was indeed Great.  He had the help of a great horse- Bucephalus.

With thanks to E.H.Gombrich, A Little History of the World.