9 hours ago @4RosesBourbon ready for the snowpocalypse

4 roses snow

Heavy alcohol/ethanol taken steadily over time

Causes shrinkage of the brain cells

A contributory factor to dementia

Alcohol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid

Sojourn

Recent investigations have suggested that acetaldehyde may be responsible for the development of alcohol addiction. Acetaldehyde in the brain may inhibit enzymes designed to convert certain nerve transmitters from aldehydes to acids. The nerve transmitters that accumulate may then react with the acetaldehyde to form compounds which are startlingly similar to certain morphine-type compounds.

http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/642alcoholmet.html

Our brain is inconceivable, beyond imagination

brain-regions-100414-02

The brain is made up of an inconceivable number of cells

An “enchanted loom” is how Charles Sherrington described the interconnected net of cells that make up our three-pound control centre. Indeed there is something almost magical in the notion that all our mental processes from perception, to memory to consciousness itself, can be described entirely by cellular activity in the brain.

The basic functional unit of the brain is the neuron, a special cell that sends electrochemical signals to other neurons (across a “synaptic gap”) and thereby creates those patterns that make up what we think of as the mind.

The complexity of the task requires a fairly inconceivable 100 billion neurons, interconnected via trillions of synapses. A single firing neutron might communicate to thousands of others in a single moment. No computer comes close to the complexity of these communicating bits of organic matter.

What’s more, for each neuron there are 10 to 15 glial cells providing structural support, protection, resources and more.

Source; http://www.livescience.com

Alcohol is a drug that goes to the brain, interfering with the cells, disrupting the communication. That is why after a few drinks we have difficulty thinking, talking, walking, eating. The more alcohol, the more out of control.

Why do we consciously interfere with the workings of this incredible machine?

If we knew how much damage we were doing to our brain, would we drink as much?

Would we drink at all?

Bacardi, the Facemask approach

Facebook, 21/7/2014; This is an extract from Bacardi Facebook

“Bacardi    Untameable   Exiled   Outlawed   Imprisoned and always free    Since 1862

7,828,000 likes       Win Electric Picnic Tickets

Your legs must be tired and voice crocked, so drop by our bar for a refreshing Bacardi Cuba Libre to make the last day of the Longitude Festival the best one yet

We’ve loads of Electric Picnic tickets to give away! All you need is a unique code found on promotional Bacardi bottles or when you buy a Bacardi at participating bars, then enter here to win”

The following information of vital consumer health interest is not to be seen anywhere on Facebook

BACARDI IS A BOTTLE OF 40% PURE ALCOHOL, a toxic, addictive, psychoactive drug

 

Alcohol and calories (in women); does drinking cause weight gain?

“When you drink alcohol, its broken down into acetaldehyde (basically vinegar) , which the body will burn before any other calorie you’ve consumed or stored including fat or even sugar. So if you drink and consume more calories than you need , you’re more likely to store the fat from the Cheez Whiz you ate and the sugar from the  Coke you drank because your body is getting all its energy from the acetaldehyde in the beer you sucked down.

Further, studies show that alcohol temporarily inhibits “lipid oxidisation” – in other words, when alcohol is in your system, it’s harder for your body to burn fat that’s already there. Since eating fat is the most metabolically efficient way to put fat on your body – you actually use a small amount of calories when you turn excess carbs and protein into body fat, but excess fat slips right into your saddlebags, no costume change necessary – hypothetically speaking, following a high fat – high alcohol diet would be the easiest way to put on weight”

Rachael Coombe, Elle.com

Is there a safe limit?

Alcohol is a toxin that kills cells such as microorganisms, which is why we use it to preserve food and sterilise skin, needles etc. Alcohol kills humans too. A dose only four times as high as the amount that would make blood levels exceed drink-driving limits in the UK can kill. The toxicity of alcohol is worsened because in order for it to be cleared from the body it has to be metabolised to acetaldehyde, an even more toxic substance. Any food or drink contaminated with the amount of acetaldehyde that a unit of alcohol produces would be immediately banned as having an unacceptable health risk

There is no such thing as a safe level of alcohol consumption. The idea that drinking small amounts of alcohol will do you no harm is a myth

Professor David Nutt/www.guardian.co.uk

The combination of  alcohol/acetaldehyde and calories/sugar is a potent double threat to human health that most drinkers are unaware of.