Calories from alcohol are “empty calories”, they have no nutritional value.

Alcoholic drinks are made by fermenting and distilling natural starch and sugar

Being high in sugar means alcohol contains lots of calories – seven calories a gram in fact, almost as many as pure fat!

Calories from alcohol are “empty calories”, they have no nutritional value. Most alcoholic drinks contains traces of vitamins and minerals, but not usually in amounts that make any significant difference to our diet.

Drinking alcohol also reduces the amount of fat your body burns for energy. While we can store nutrients, protein, carbohydrates, and fat in our bodies, we can’t store alcohol. So our systems want to get rid of it, and doing so takes priority. All of the other processes that should be taking place ( including absorbing nutrients and burning fat) are interrupted.

With a pint of lager containing the same amount of calories as a slice of pizza, the calories soon add up

A pint of Heineken, 5% alcohol has 227 calories

A large glass of red wine, 13% alcohol has 170 calories

A Jack Daniels, 40% alcohol has 111 calories

Source: Drinkaware.co.uk

 

Why calories in alcohol are extra fattening

Alcoholic drinks are made by fermenting and distilling natural starch and sugar

Being high in sugar means alcohol contains lots of calories – seven calories a gram in fact, almost as many as pure fat!

Calories from alcohol are “empty calories”, they have no nutritional value. Most alcoholic drinks contains traces of vitamins and minerals, but not usually in amounts that make any significant difference to our diet.

Drinking alcohol also reduces the amount of fat your body burns for energy. While we can store nutrients, protein, carbohydrates, and fat in our bodies, we can’t store alcohol. So our systems want to get rid of it, and doing so takes priority. All of the other processes that should be taking place ( including absorbing nutrients and burning fat) are interrupted.

With a pint of lager containing the same amount of calories as a slice of pizza, the calories soon add up

A pint of Heineken, 5% alcohol has 227 calories

A large glass of red wine, 13% alcohol has 170 calories

A Jack Daniels, 40% alcohol has 111 calories

Source: Drinkaware.co.uk

 

Typical Sunday Night?

Typical sunday nightTypical sunday night

Alcohol contains only empty calories and has no nutritional value.

It can contribute to malnutrition because high levels of calories in wine

can account for a large percentage of your daily energy requirements.

Even one drink of wine a day can contribute to malnutrition

The French Paradox, vitamin K2 the key

The French Paradox, the claim the French lived longer than Americans because they drink more red wine was put forward by Dr Serge Renaud in the 1990’s. He said red wine had nutrients like resveratrol which helped reduce heart disease. Even though the French had  more dairy products like cheese, in their diet

This claim has since been debunked because you would have to drink so much red wine to get enough of these nutrients, to increase the risk  of other diseases like cirrhosis. The research did highlight the presence of vitamin K2 in the French diet.  Vitamin K2 is a known factor in reduced levels of heart disease. The vitamin is to be found in green leafy vegetables, fruits, grains and dairy products.

The French diet is rich in vitamin K2

In her 2012 book, Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox, Canadian nutritionist Kate Rhéume-Bleue proposes that the explanation for the lower rate of cardiovascular disease in France is the high level of vitamin K2 (also known as menaquinone) in some of the fattier foods that form a part of the French diet. Lack of vitamin K2 in the diet is linked to increased calcification of plaques in artery walls.

Rhéume-Bleue writes,

The French Paradox isn’t a paradox at all. The very same pâté de foie gras, egg yolks and creamy, buttery sauces that we inaccurately labeled “heart attack on a plate“ literally supply the single most important nutrient to protect heart health.[23]

As one example, Rhéume-Bleue points to the fact that a 3 ½-ounce serving of goose liver pate contains 369 micrograms of menaquinone, while a 3 ½-ounce serving of pan-fried calf liver of the kind frequently eaten in North America contains only 6 micrograms of menaquinone.[24]

The French diet is rich in short-chain saturated fatty acids and poor in trans fats

In his 2009 book Cholesterol and The French Paradox, Frank Cooper argues that the French paradox is due to the lack of hydrogenated and trans fats in the French diet.[25] The French diet is based on natural saturated fats such as butter, cheese and cream that the human body finds easy to metabolize, because they are rich in shorter saturated fatty acids ranging from the 4-carbon butyric acid to the 16-carbon palmitic acid. But the American diet includes greater amounts saturated fats made via hydrogenating vegetable oils which include longer 18- and 20-carbon fatty acids. In addition, these hydrogenated fats include small quantities of trans fats which may have associated health risks.[26][27][28]

 

10 sneaky ways to lose weight

 
  1. When Out With Friends, Order First. If you do you’re more likely to order something you want. When people are together they tend to eat the same things
  2. Set the mood. If you’re eating out,  soft and quiet is better than loud and glary. You eat less if you’re relaxed – spend more time talking
  3. Use chop sticks. Chopsticks slow you down and make you eat less food with every bite
  4. Remember veggies first. Research says the first food we pick we’ll eat the most, so start with salads
  5. Never leave food where you can see it. Regardless of whether you are eating out or at home. Seeing it fills your thoughts with food
  6. Follow the rule of two.When dining out, select whatever reasonable main entrée you want (plus included sides) and pair it with only two other things to eat and drink.
  7. Place a Napkin on Your Lap
    People who do this before eating tend to have a healthier body mass index, according to Cornell University researchers. That’s because using a napkin reflects good table manners, says Wansink, and careful eaters often pay more attention to what they’re eating—and, as a result, how many calories they’re consuming.
  8. Ignore Healthy Buzzwords.
    Organic,” “all natural,” “low fat,” “a full serving of vegetables”—research shows that food descriptions that include veggies or other seemingly healthy attributes often make us believe that we’re consuming fewer calories than we actually are
  9. Ditch Cold Cereals
    Louisiana State University researchers found that women who eat a warm bowl of oatmeal served with fat-free milk feel 28 percent less hungry for up to four hours later compared with when they pour their breakfast from a box. Oatmeal’s fiber which takes longer to digest) is the secret
  10. Fill Your Instagram With Healthy Pics
    And follow friends who do the same. Researchers from England’s University of Leeds found that people eat fewer calories—and make better choices—after seeing shots of nutritious foods. “Visual cues prime you to eat right,” says Durvasula. The idea works at home or the office too—swap the candy bowl for fresh fruit. And just like that you’re eating healthier.

http://www.styleist.com/category/health-and-wellness

Losing weight? Here’s how to put it back

Drinking deadens your appetite. Heavy drinking can cause malnutrition

How to increase calories

  • Add butter or margarine to soups, mashed and baked potatoes, sauces, cooked vegetables, rice
  • Add whipped cream to desserts, puddings and fruit. Add it unsweetened to mashed potatoes and pureed vegetables
  • Add milk or cream to soups, sauces, puddings, custard,cereals. Use cream instead of milk in recipes
  • Add cheese to casseroles, potatoes,vegetables, omelettes, sandwiches. Melt where possible
  • Add chopped hard-boiled eggs to salads,vegetables, casseroles
  • Saute or fry foods if you can tolerate them
  • Add sauces or gravies to your food

How to increase protein

  • Eat more hard and soft cheeses. Add them to food where possible
  • Use milk instead of water as a drink and in cooking whenever possible. Use full-fat milk
  • Take build – up drinks
  • Add ice cream or yoghurt to drinks, fruit and cereals
  • Add eggs to your food whenever possible. Avoid raw eggs
  • Add nuts, seeds and wheat germ to your food. Add to casseroles, salads, breads, biscuits
  • Add chopped meat or fish to vegetables,salads, casseroles,soups, baked potatoes
  • Eat more beans and peas. Add to soups and casseroles

http://www.cancer.ie

Eggs, a very useful low calorie food

nutrition1WaistbandOmlette-575x262

For those interested in weight loss,research indicates that increased protein and reduced carbohydrate intake stabilise blood sugar between meals and reduce snacking. Eggs are a very useful low calorie food that provides large amounts of nutrients. Because they have no carbohydrates, they do not have a GI (glycaemic index) and are useful in a low GI diet

Ham and Spinach Frittata

This type of omelette is called  a frittata in Italy and is delicious hot or cold. It is cooked until set firm, making it an excellent picnic food or served with salad and potatoes makes a perfect dinner. Eggs are such good value and are a great source of protein.

Serve with: lightly dressed green salad and boiled new potatoes

Ingredients ( serves 4)

Knob of butter

1 small onion, finely chopped

350g fresh spinach, tough stalks removed

8 large Bord Bia Quality Assured eggs, beaten

100g cooked ham or loin of bacon, cut into cubes

50g hard cheese, finely grated

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 tablesp. olive oil

Method

Preheat the grill and heat a large non-stick frying pan. Add a knob of butter to the pan and cook the onion for 4-5 minutes until softened but not coloured. Stir in the spinach and cook for a few minutes until wilted. Turn the mixture into a sieve and press well with a wooden spoon to squeeze out the excess liquid. Then place the spinach on a board and roughly chop. Lightly beat the eggs in a large bowl, then fold in the spinach mixture with the cooked ham and bacon and most of the cheese. Keep about 2 tablespoons aside to use later. Season with salt and pepper. Wipe out the frying pan and then return it to the heat and add the oil. Swirl to coat the sides of the pan evenly, then pour in the egg mixture and cook for about 5 minutes over a low heat to set the bottom and sides. Scatter over the remaining cheese and cook gently for another couple of minutes, then flash under the grill for 4-5 minutes until lightly golden and set. Leave to settle in the pan for a few minutes before cutting into wedges and arranging on the plate with salad and potatoes.

http://www.eggs.ie/health/nutrition

Too much wine

If you travel from Nimes to Perpignan in the South West of France, you see much of the Languedoc Rousillon region given over to the production of wine. France is the biggest producer of wine in the world and consumes most of it in these parts. That’s because there is little demand for it abroad, the quality is too questionable and variable

The consumption of so much alcohol has inevitable consequences for health. Much has been made of the health benefits of red wine, mostly by the French themselves when they saw consumption slipping. Any benefits you get from the resveratrol in red wine for the heart, is more than outweighed by other diseases

The French have a tough choice, to move all this production away from wine and into food

Wine producers understandably don’t want to, but the authorities have little option

Demand for fruit and veg. is outpacing cheap alcohol. There are big benefits in the long-term

Less cancer, liver cirrhosis and road accidents

Why porridge oats are considered a Superfood!

  • They are low in fat and saturated fat- foods that are low in fat are important in the treatment of obesity, heart disease and diabetes
  • They have a medium glycaemic Index – foods with low to medium GI and high soluble fibre content (such as oats, beans, lentils) can help reduce blood cholesterol as part of a healthy diet
  • They are high in soluble fibre
  • They are low in salt and sugar
  • They contain a variety of vitamins and minerals
  • Oats can be added to sweet and savoury foods
  • Porridge oats can be made in the microwave in minutes

Nuala Collins, Leading independent nutritionist

Oatmeal Hotcakes with vanilla yogurt and berries

Ingredients (serves 4)

For the Hot Cakes

  • 2/3 cup (150 g) natural yogurt
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) milk
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1/3 cup (50g) plain flour
  • 1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 cup (80g) Flahavans Progress Oatlets
  • 2 egg whites whisked
  • butter for cooking

Optional Hot Cakes flavouring

  • vanilla extract, ground cinnamon, grated lemon zest, sugar

To Serve

  • 1 1/2 cups (225g) mixed berries
  • 1/2 cup (120g) vanilla yogurt

Cooking and Serving instructions

  1. Whisk the yogurt, milk and egg yolks in a bowl and then sieve in the flour and baking powder and mix well
  2. Fold the oats and egg whites gently into the yogurt mix to make a light and fluffy batter
  3. For optional flavour, add in some vanilla extract, or ground cinnamon, or grated lemon zest or sugar
  4. Melt some butter in a pan/skillet over a medium heat
  5. Drop the mixture on to the pan using one tablespoon per hot cake
  6. Cook for 2-3 min each side until golden and fluffy
  7. Serve with mixed berries and vanilla yogurt

Neven Maguire – TV chef and proprietor MacNean House. http://www.flahavans.ie;

Wholegrains (porridge), so good in so many ways

Wholegrains

Wholegrains are very beneficial in the diet because they help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, several forms of cancer and some gastrointestinal problems. The risk of both heart disease and diabetes may be up to 30% lower in people who regularly eat wholegrains as part of a low-fat diet and healthy lifestyle.

Eat porridge oats at breakfast and get 2 wholegrain servings. A bowl of porridge oats (40g serving of oats = 2 servings of wholegrains) meets 66% of the recommended daily amount of wholegrains.

Irish Oatmeal with diced cranberries, flaked almonds and orange zest;

Neven Maguire – TV chef and Proprietor of MacNean House

Ingredients (Serves 2-3)

  • 3/4 pint – 1 pint (11/2 cups/350-475ml) of milk, (according to desired consistency)
  • 4oz (11/2 cups/110g of Flahavans Irish Oatmeal
  • Zest of half an orange
  • 1 tbsp cranberries
  • Toasted flaked almonds to serve

Cooking and Serving instructions

  1. Place the oats and milk in a saucepan and bring to the boil
  2. Reduce the heat and simmer for 3-4 minutes until soft & creamy
  3. Grate the orange zest
  4. Add dried cranberries
  5. Place in a bowl and serve sprinkled with toasted almonds

Sound health!

Source; http://www.flahavans.ie